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Doctor is missing but video is destined to be a hit (1995)

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The immortal Doctor Who refuses to die but it's more a case of Doctor Where? in a new video spin-off from the classic science fiction series. The time travelling Doctor is nowhere to be seen in the video Downtime, released on Monday, nor are the Tardis or any Daleks. But die-hard fans are expected to lap up the new adventure anyway. The children's classic ran for 26 series from 1963 to 1989 and featured seven different actors in the Doctor Who role. Despite axing the series amid an outcry from fans, BBC TV still has the rights to the character and creator Terry Nation owns the rights to the Daleks. So this latest adventure, made with help from the Doctor Who Appreciation Society, features three characters from the programme's golden age, but not the Doctor himself. Anyone who used to cower behind the sofa as a child in the 1960s will remember Victoria, played by Deborah Watling, and the Brigadier, played by Nicholas Courtney. Later generations will recognise Elisabeth Sladen, who played Sarah Jane Smith to Tom Baker's Doctor in the 1970s. Together they fight the Yetis, enemies of Patrick Troughton's Doctor in the 1960s and still seeking world domination in the 1990s. Producer and fan Keith Barnfather, who has been talking to television stations other than the BBC about possible broadcast, said: "It's the first broadcast quality spin-off for about six years. "Some people say that with new technology it looks even better than the old Doctor Who. "Of course you can't blame the BBC for looking after their copyright, and we are very grateful to be allowed to use these characters, but I feel very strongly they should still be making Dr Who in this country. "It was still making a profit when they axed it. If they don't revive it soon the series could die forever." The BBC has signed a co-production deal with American film giant Universal to make a Doctor in America one-off television film. "It's still at the scriptwriting stage at the moment, but it could go into production next year," a BBC Worldwide Television spokeswoman said today. Downtime will cost £11.99, runs for 70 minutes and has a PG certificate.

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  • APA 6th ed.: Burdon, Jackie (1995-11-03). Doctor is missing but video is destined to be a hit. Press Association .
  • MLA 7th ed.: Burdon, Jackie. "Doctor is missing but video is destined to be a hit." Press Association [add city] 1995-11-03. Print.
  • Chicago 15th ed.: Burdon, Jackie. "Doctor is missing but video is destined to be a hit." Press Association, edition, sec., 1995-11-03
  • Turabian: Burdon, Jackie. "Doctor is missing but video is destined to be a hit." Press Association, 1995-11-03, section, edition.
  • Wikipedia (this article): <ref>{{cite news| title=Doctor is missing but video is destined to be a hit | url=http://cuttingsarchive.org/index.php/Doctor_is_missing_but_video_is_destined_to_be_a_hit | work=Press Association | pages= | date=1995-11-03 | via=Doctor Who Cuttings Archive | accessdate=22 November 2017 }}</ref>
  • Wikipedia (this page): <ref>{{cite web | title=Doctor is missing but video is destined to be a hit | url=http://cuttingsarchive.org/index.php/Doctor_is_missing_but_video_is_destined_to_be_a_hit | work=Doctor Who Cuttings Archive | accessdate=22 November 2017}}</ref>