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Daleks-Invasion Earth 2150 AD

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1966-07-14 Kinematograph Weekly.jpg

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BLC/British Lion. British. U. In Technicolor and Techniscope. Featuring Peter Cushing, Bernard Cribbins, Ray Brooks, Andrew Keir, Roberta Tovey and Jill Curzon. Produced by Max J. Rosenberg and Milton Subotsky. Directed by Gordon Flemyng. Screenplay by Milton Subotsky. Director of photography John Wilcox. Music by Bill McGuffie. 84 minutes. Released August 5, 1966.

SPACE-FICTION adventure based on the television serial "Dr. Who." by Terry Nation. This time. Dr. Who, his niece. Louise and his granddaughter. Susan. arrive back in London in 2150 A.D. to find it almost completely destroyed by a Dalek invasion. They have with them a London special constable. Tom Campbell. who. thinking the Tardis was a real police-box, dashed into it to report a smash-and-grab. just as the doctor's space and time ship was about to take off. The doctor and his party are helped by Wyler and David. two leaders of an underground group of London survivors. They become separated, but all meet again in Hereford. where the doctor and Tom combine to foil the plan of the Daleks to convert the earth into a huge, manoeuvrable space ship. The doctor contrives to use the Earth's vast magnetic force to make the Daleks destroy themselves; the invasion is thus repelled and the doctor brings Tom back to the present in time for him to capture the smash-and-grabbers single-handed.

The apparently imperishable popularity of the Daleks makes this ideal holiday entertainment, with, of course, an especial appeal to the youngsters. Sure-fire family fare.

Production.—This, the second of the Dalek stories to be made into a cinema film, has none of the slapstick comedy of the first, and gains by it. The director has aimed at fast-moving adventure, and has succeeded by simple straight-forward photography, combined with impressive special effects, with plenty of death-rays, flaring explosions and a simply smashing flying saucer. The Daleks are far more numerous than on television, but are just as gratingly menacing and, of course, distinguished in rank by their colours. There are also horrible, robotised humans in shiny black plastic suits and crash helmets, and the usual array of pseudo-electronic machinery flashing coloured lights in all directions. Indeed. the folk possible use has been made of colour, and here is never a dull moment. In such a film, acting, as such, is inclined to be subsidiary to he gadgets, but the principals perform staunchly. Peter Cushing is the same firm but courageous and courageous Dr. Who that he was before, and comedian Bernard Cribbins does a first class job of being amusing without being ludicrous as the hi-jacked policeman.

Points of appeal—Daleks. adventure, flying saucer, colour, wide-screen, compact footage, U certificate and quota value.

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  • APA 6th ed.: (1966-07-14). Daleks-Invasion Earth 2150 AD. Kinematograph Weekly p. 17.
  • MLA 7th ed.: "Daleks-Invasion Earth 2150 AD." Kinematograph Weekly [add city] 1966-07-14, 17. Print.
  • Chicago 15th ed.: "Daleks-Invasion Earth 2150 AD." Kinematograph Weekly, edition, sec., 1966-07-14
  • Turabian: "Daleks-Invasion Earth 2150 AD." Kinematograph Weekly, 1966-07-14, section, 17 edition.
  • Wikipedia (this article): <ref>{{cite news| title=Daleks-Invasion Earth 2150 AD | url=http://cuttingsarchive.org/index.php/Daleks-Invasion_Earth_2150_AD | work=Kinematograph Weekly | pages=17 | date=1966-07-14 | via=Doctor Who Cuttings Archive | accessdate=14 November 2019 }}</ref>
  • Wikipedia (this page): <ref>{{cite web | title=Daleks-Invasion Earth 2150 AD | url=http://cuttingsarchive.org/index.php/Daleks-Invasion_Earth_2150_AD | work=Doctor Who Cuttings Archive | accessdate=14 November 2019}}</ref>