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Difference between revisions of "Doctor Who smart sci-fi"

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| description =  
 
| description =  
 
| categories =  
 
| categories =  
| moreTitles = Doctor Who smart sci-fi, Dr. Who a feast for the senses
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| moreTitles = Doctor Who smart sci-fi, Dr. Who a feast for the senses, Dr. Who a feast for the senses
| morePublications = Ottawa Citizen, Calgary Herald
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| morePublications = Ottawa Citizen, Calgary Herald, Edmonton Journal
| moreDates = 2010-07-24, 2010-07-24
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| moreDates = 2010-07-24, 2010-07-24, 2010-07-24
 
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| text =  
 
Tonight's episode of the long-lived British sci-fi series, Doctor Who, is a mind-bending, time-warping, universe-collapsing frenzy of smart one-liners, surprising plot twists and a very satisfying ending indeed.
 
Tonight's episode of the long-lived British sci-fi series, Doctor Who, is a mind-bending, time-warping, universe-collapsing frenzy of smart one-liners, surprising plot twists and a very satisfying ending indeed.

Latest revision as of 19:21, 11 September 2019

2010-07-24 Ottawa Citizen.jpg

[edit]

Tonight's episode of the long-lived British sci-fi series, Doctor Who, is a mind-bending, time-warping, universe-collapsing frenzy of smart one-liners, surprising plot twists and a very satisfying ending indeed.

The Big Bang is the conclusion of a two-part Season 5 finale, following from the cliffhanger of The Pandorica Opens — in which The Doctor was sealed in the Pandorica (a box with the power to "reboot the universe), Amy Pond was shot by a replica of her boyfriend, and River Song was trapped in the TARDIS (The Doctor's time machine/spacecraft) as it exploded, triggering the end of the universe.

The Big Bang begins peacefully enough with a young Amy Pond, circa 1996, a girl who imagines there are stars in a universe that actually contains only the sun, the Earth, and the moon. The episode is a convoluted, fast-paced, and utterly entertaining feast for the senses and the mind. It includes a fossilized Dalek, a sonic screwdriver, and an old, blue diary that proves to be the key to sealing a crack in the universe.

A real treat for fans, and a smart, rambunctious slice of sci-fi for everyone else. (9 p.m., Space)

Disclaimer: These citations are created on-the-fly using primitive parsing techniques. You should double-check all citations. Send feedback to whovian@cuttingsarchive.org

  • APA 6th ed.: Liepins, Larissa (2010-07-24). Doctor Who smart sci-fi. Postmedia News .
  • MLA 7th ed.: Liepins, Larissa. "Doctor Who smart sci-fi." Postmedia News [add city] 2010-07-24. Print.
  • Chicago 15th ed.: Liepins, Larissa. "Doctor Who smart sci-fi." Postmedia News, edition, sec., 2010-07-24
  • Turabian: Liepins, Larissa. "Doctor Who smart sci-fi." Postmedia News, 2010-07-24, section, edition.
  • Wikipedia (this article): <ref>{{cite news| title=Doctor Who smart sci-fi | url=http://cuttingsarchive.org/index.php/Doctor_Who_smart_sci-fi | work=Postmedia News | pages= | date=2010-07-24 | via=Doctor Who Cuttings Archive | accessdate=19 September 2019 }}</ref>
  • Wikipedia (this page): <ref>{{cite web | title=Doctor Who smart sci-fi | url=http://cuttingsarchive.org/index.php/Doctor_Who_smart_sci-fi | work=Doctor Who Cuttings Archive | accessdate=19 September 2019}}</ref>
  • Title: Doctor Who smart sci-fi
  • Publication: Ottawa Citizen
  • Date: 2010-07-24

  • Title: Dr. Who a feast for the senses
  • Publication: Calgary Herald
  • Date: 2010-07-24

  • Title: Dr. Who a feast for the senses
  • Publication: Edmonton Journal
  • Date: 2010-07-24