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Difference between revisions of "High camp for kiddies"

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I'm not sure if [[wikipedia:Professor Hermann Bondi|Hermann Bondi]] (of the excellent the E=mc2 series) would approve the do-it-yourself relativity, both for the performance and the disarming appearance a police telephone kiosk) of its central feature, a vehicle which can zoom with equal ease through time and space. But I am sure but this new B.B.C. tea-time serial has got off to a cracking start, with the heroes and whisked back to [[broadwcast:An Unearthly Child|the stone age]].
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I'm not sure if [[wikipedia:Hermann Bondi|Professor Hermann Bondi]] (of the excellent the E=mc2 series) would approve the do-it-yourself relativity, both for the performance and the disarming appearance a police telephone kiosk) of its central feature, a vehicle which can zoom with equal ease through time and space. But I am sure but this new B.B.C. tea-time serial has got off to a cracking start, with the heroes and whisked back to [[broadwcast:An Unearthly Child|the stone age]].
  
 
On its own level (aimed mainly at 11-14s) it exhibits the same high spirited self-mockery as its grown-up contemporary "The Avengers."
 
On its own level (aimed mainly at 11-14s) it exhibits the same high spirited self-mockery as its grown-up contemporary "The Avengers."
  
 
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Latest revision as of 22:45, 28 May 2017

1963-12-01 Sunday Telegraph.jpg

[edit]

I'm not sure if Professor Hermann Bondi (of the excellent the E=mc2 series) would approve the do-it-yourself relativity, both for the performance and the disarming appearance a police telephone kiosk) of its central feature, a vehicle which can zoom with equal ease through time and space. But I am sure but this new B.B.C. tea-time serial has got off to a cracking start, with the heroes and whisked back to the stone age.

On its own level (aimed mainly at 11-14s) it exhibits the same high spirited self-mockery as its grown-up contemporary "The Avengers."

Disclaimer: These citations are created on-the-fly using primitive parsing techniques. You should double-check all citations. Send feedback to whovian@cuttingsarchive.org

  • APA 6th ed.: (1963-12-01). High camp for kiddies. The Sunday Telegraph (England) p. 15.
  • MLA 7th ed.: "High camp for kiddies." The Sunday Telegraph (England) [add city] 1963-12-01, 15. Print.
  • Chicago 15th ed.: "High camp for kiddies." The Sunday Telegraph (England), edition, sec., 1963-12-01
  • Turabian: "High camp for kiddies." The Sunday Telegraph (England), 1963-12-01, section, 15 edition.
  • Wikipedia (this article): <ref>{{cite news| title=High camp for kiddies | url=http://cuttingsarchive.org/index.php/High_camp_for_kiddies | work=The Sunday Telegraph (England) | pages=15 | date=1963-12-01 | via=Doctor Who Cuttings Archive | accessdate=25 November 2020 }}</ref>
  • Wikipedia (this page): <ref>{{cite web | title=High camp for kiddies | url=http://cuttingsarchive.org/index.php/High_camp_for_kiddies | work=Doctor Who Cuttings Archive | accessdate=25 November 2020}}</ref>