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Revolution of the Daleks marked the return of the "most evil killing machine in the universe"

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2021-01-03 Sunday Times Culture.jpg

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When it comes to recycling, though, the makers of Doctor Who are the masters. Revolution of the Daleks marked the return of the "most evil killing machine in the universe", those Frank Sinatras of the alien world back in Vegas one more time. Also reupholstered was John Barrowman's beloved Captain Jack, conduit for lots of meaningful conversations about how it feels to be a companion, caught up in the Doctor's messianic whirl. The story - no subtext here involved the incompetent politician Harriet Walter and evil captain of industry Chris Noth forming a craven partnership predicated on the public's desire for "security", but unfortunately unleashing forces they could not control.

This was a strong return - monster-heavy, full of wisecracks - but Doctor Who drags so much backstory and heritage behind it that each episode can feel like a long, illustrated exposition (Elucidate! Elucidate!). The choppy pacing isn't helped by a tangible desire to hit every audience demographic's targets - explosions, satire, Gen-Z emotions. Yet there was no doubt it came from a good place, the battle between Jodie Whittaker's delightfully positive two-hearted saviour and her still-terrifying arch-enemies one that it was possible to win. For a moment it made the world - if not the universe - feel slightly brighter. As they said, never underestimate a Dalek.

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  • APA 6th ed.: Segal, Victoria (2021-01-03). Revolution of the Daleks marked the return of the "most evil killing machine in the universe". The Sunday Times p. Culture, p. 14.
  • MLA 7th ed.: Segal, Victoria. "Revolution of the Daleks marked the return of the "most evil killing machine in the universe"." The Sunday Times [add city] 2021-01-03, Culture, p. 14. Print.
  • Chicago 15th ed.: Segal, Victoria. "Revolution of the Daleks marked the return of the "most evil killing machine in the universe"." The Sunday Times, edition, sec., 2021-01-03
  • Turabian: Segal, Victoria. "Revolution of the Daleks marked the return of the "most evil killing machine in the universe"." The Sunday Times, 2021-01-03, section, Culture, p. 14 edition.
  • Wikipedia (this article): <ref>{{cite news| title=Revolution of the Daleks marked the return of the "most evil killing machine in the universe" | url=http://cuttingsarchive.org/index.php/Revolution_of_the_Daleks_marked_the_return_of_the_%22most_evil_killing_machine_in_the_universe%22 | work=The Sunday Times | pages=Culture, p. 14 | date=2021-01-03 | via=Doctor Who Cuttings Archive | accessdate=29 June 2022 }}</ref>
  • Wikipedia (this page): <ref>{{cite web | title=Revolution of the Daleks marked the return of the "most evil killing machine in the universe" | url=http://cuttingsarchive.org/index.php/Revolution_of_the_Daleks_marked_the_return_of_the_%22most_evil_killing_machine_in_the_universe%22 | work=Doctor Who Cuttings Archive | accessdate=29 June 2022}}</ref>