Doctor Who Cuttings Archive

The Many Faces of Doctor Who

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A special pictorial overview


It was November 23, 1963.

A remarkable event occurred on British television channel BBC-1. From a modest beginning with an audience of 3 million viewers and a shoestring budget in the range of $4,000, this off-beat and often whimsical science fiction/fantasy series has captivated, thrilled and delighted fans of all ages, from Great Britain to the United States.

What, or more precisely, who was it? Doctor Who, of course.

The show was born when Sidney Newman (the newly-appointed Head of Drama for the BBC) and Donald Wilson (director of serials and series) got together to create a new Saturday afternoon serial that would appeal to youngsters and the rest of the family as well.

The new creation bypassed the old formulas for space opera. The results: today, the world is familiar with the time-space traveler with the twin hearts, respiratory bypass system and body temperature of 60° Fahrenheit. Dr. Who is not only one of the best known shows on the BBC, but it has the distinction of being the longest running fantasy series ever to appear on the tube.

Instead of the usual Flash Gordon-ish hero, Newman and Wilson had other ideas for their lead character. Incredibly old (745 years to the day); looking to be in his early 60s; eccentric, brilliant, irascible, stubborn, crafty. These were some of the characteristics of "The Doctor," whose mode of dress made him look as if he had just stepped out of the Edwardian Age. He hated evil, injustice, fools—and being tied down to one place for a long period of time.

His time/space-ship appeared to look like an old, blue London Police Box, a sort of phone booth from which the public could make emergency calls for assistance. But its interior was out-of-this-world! Inside, the Tardis (short for Time And Relative Dimensions In Space) was transcendentally dimensional, or bigger on the inside than the outside. This state has caused some of the characters to become a bit unsettled. During the show's lengthy run, two things have remained constant: the Tardis still looks like an old blue Police Box, and its interior is still bigger on the inside. By the end of the series' 15th season, viewers learned that the Tardis contains at least 23 levels!

According to reports, Dr. Who was originally intended to be more historical/educational in nature. The Tardis was to take its passengers to various eras in history where they'd get involved in events of the time. Alien monsters weren't really contemplated at first. Any "science fiction" would be based on solid scientific speculation, an idea that didn't exactly inspire confidence in some quarters of the BBC. One executive is reported to have said, "I can only predict disaster. How can this crazy fellow who travels all over the galaxy, using a London Police Box for a spacecraft, last more than a dozen episodes?" How indeed!

As the show began to take form, Verity Lambert became its first producer, while David Whitaker became the series' script editor. Besides getting cooperation from the various technical departments, paying writers, getting actors to work for low fees, one of Lambert's main problems was finding an actor to portray the Doctor. The film, This Sporting Life, brought veteran actor William Hartnell to her attention with his performance as a seedy Rugby scout. Previously, Hartnell was best known for his film roles as tough-guy characters. Miss Lambert arranged a meeting with the actor, but Hartnell was reportedly reluctant to become involved in a children's TV show. Then, his agent is said to have convinced him that it was just the kind of part he had been wanting to do.

Hartnell recalls, "The moment this brilliant young producer started telling me about Dr. Who, I was hooked. It may look like hindsight now, but I knew, I just knew that the series was going to be an enormous success. I remember telling Verity at the start: 'This is going to run for five years!' " His powers of prophecy were correct, but even Hartnell couldn't know just how correct he would be.

Dr. Who made its debut with the four-episode "An Unearthly Child," introducing the series' original main characters, the Doctor and his three companions: his granddaughter Susan (Carole Ann Ford) and two unwilling passengers on board the Tardis, high school teachers Barbara Wright (Jacqueline Hill) and Ian Chesterton (William Russell). The story had the two instructors quite curious about Susan's background, due to her brilliance in some subjects and disorientation in others. Their curiosity led them to a junkyard in Totter's Lane and the discovery that "home" is what looks like an old blue Police Box. Their intrusion into the domain of Susan's grandfather results in their being whisked into the Time/Space Vortex before the Doctor is convinced to return them to Earth. But the controls that guide the Tardis to the proper time and place are in need of repair. They've returned to Earth—the Earth of 100,000 BC!

The audience for the first story was not one that would impress easily during that make-or-break season. The show had debuted in the wake of John F. Kennedy's assassination. Not exactly a good omen. The next episode would change all that.

"The Dead Planet" was a seven-part thriller by Terry Nation, who was generally known for comedy. At first, Nation told his agent to turn the offer down, but, upon reconsidering, decided to accept. Then, comedian Eric Sykes had an assignment for Nation, but he had to go to Sweden to work on it. Nation wrote the Who script within a short seven days—and on the seventh, he went to Sweden. The script was a classic.

Hideous machine-like creatures. They are legless, moving on a round base. They have no human features. A lens on a flexible shaft acts as an eye. Arms with mechanical grips for hands. Thus was born the first concept for Dr. Who's most popular monsters: the Daleks!

BBC designers Raymond Cusick, Jack Kine and Bernard Wilkie came up with designs that gave the Daleks their pepper-pot look. The first episode of the story was telecast on December 23, 1963. It was quite a Christmas present. Terry Nation recalled afterward, "It was a good eerie beginning and, at the end of it, in the last frame of the picture, we saw a bit of a Dalek—and the phone started to ring, people saying, 'Christ, what is that thing?'"

"The Dead Planet" triggered off a national phenomenon: England went Dalek-happy! A tidal wave of Dalek merchandise materialized. Two movies were made about the Daleks, with Peter Cushing as the Doctor. The BBC had a hit on their hands—so did Nation, who owns the rights on the Daleks. Despite his other successes (including the popular BBC space-opera Blake's 7), Nation's link with his monstrous "children" is as strong as ever. "Life with the Daleks has not been without problems," he once noted. "Their continued existence means that I find it impossible to write another successful monster into Dr. Who. Nobody has ever killed off their brainchild as thoroughly as I have annihilated mine, unless it was Conan Doyle trying to rid himself of Sherlock Holmes."

The Daleks' success set the future course for the series. By the end of the fourth season, the historical sagas were a thing of the past.

Then William Hartnell decided to leave the show in 1966 (the reasons aren't fully known, although some sources cite his health as one of the factors). Writers Kid Pedler and Gerry Davis came up with a gimmick that enabled Hartnell to leave the series gracefully.

The gimmick was the Doctor's ability to "regenerate" his body, that is, replace his old, worn-out body with a new, different, vigorous frame. By the end of the last Hartnell story, "The Tenth Planet," viewers were prepared for the moment when Hartnell's Doctor became a new man—literally!

Doctor 2 emerged as a likeable character who not only added a deceptively light touch to the proceedings, but also helped add a reassuring element that took some of the sting out of the series' frightening and violent moments. In an outfit resembling Hartnell's suit, albeit a size or two too large for him, sporting a hairdo reminiscent of the Beatles or the Three Stooges' Moe Howard, Patrick Troughton's traveler began a bit on the clownish side, but mellowed as time went by. His coat pockets seemed to hold an unnerving array of items, including a medieval recorder (which he would play from time to time when thinking) and his 500-Year Diary.

One of the factors that has kept the series fresh throughout the years has been the different interpretations of the Doctor by the four actors who have played the character so far.

Troughton's version has been called "the cosmic hobo" due to his appearance and off-beat, humorous aspects. Troughton learned his craft at the Embassy School of Acting and the Leighton Rallius School. He served with the Royal Navy during WWII (getting his own command after the invasion of Normandy) before returning to acting after his discharge in 1945. He was working on The Viking Queen in Ireland when the BBC approached him about becoming the new Doctor. At first Troughton (who watched the show with his children) was reluctant, not sure that the part was right for him. The BBC persisted. Soon afterward he took the role.

With the conclusion of the sixth season, Troughton decided to move on to other things. He went out in a blaze of glory in the ten-episode classic, "The War Games," which has its own unique niche in Dr. Who history in that it revealed his origin as a "runaway" from the planet Gallifrey and its people, the Time Lords. Highly advanced, able to journey through time and space and regenerate their bodies (no more than twelve times, however), the Time Lords used their powers and technology to monitor and observe events in the Universe. They also followed a strict rule of noninvolvement, even when cosmic evil threatened.

It was this attitude that caused the Doctor to steal a Tardis in for repairs (thereby explaining its malfunctions) and begin his travels. Captured and brought to trial by the Time Lords after his experiences with the evil War Lords, he was charged with stealing the Tardis and violating the non-interference law. His defense speech made the Judges realize that they couldn't ignore evil that threatened the Universe. Instead of destruction, the Doctor would be exiled to 20th century Earth and the secret of the Tardis taken from him. When he protested that he was too well known on Earth and would be vulnerable, the Time Lords began the regeneration/change once more.

Jon Pertwee stepped into the Doctor's shoes with the seventh season. The tall, white-haired, multi-talented performer was already known in the realm of light entertainment, as well as having appeared in nearly every medium. Pertwee had been featured in the radio series, The Navy Lark, when told of Troughton's decision. When it was suggested that Pertwee try for the part of the Doctor, the actor dismissed the idea. Nevertheless, he and his agent contacted Peter Bryant, the show's producer. Bryant read the series' short-list (the immediate first choices) of actors being considered for the role. Pertwee's name was on it—at the very top. That did it.

Pertwee's Doctor was a man of action, ready and able to engage in hand-to-claw combat with the show's monsters. Actually he was one of the few two-armed beings to master the martial arts form of Venusian Akido (just how many arms do those Venusians have?). His taste in clothing leaned towards the elegantly eccentric. He loved gadgets and drove a souped-up Edwardian roadster dubbed "Bessie." He was prepared for mechanical emergencies with his trusty screwdriver.

Doctor 3 served as the scientific advisor to UNIT (United Nations Intelligence Taskforce), formed to combat alien invasions of Earth. UNIT and its senior officer, Brigadier Alastair Gordon Lethbridge Stewart, had been introduced during the Troughton period and would remain until the era of the fourth Doctor. Nicholas Courtney was a perfect choice for the Brigadier, his military mind coping with the Doctor's unorthodox ways of getting things done. Sgt. Benton (John Levene) and Captain Mike Yates (Richard Franklyn) would provide able assistance until UNIT would be phased out of the series six seasons later.

A memorable character introduced during the Pertwee era was The Master, a renegade Time Lord who lusted for power and delighted in chaos. Roger Delgado played the satanic-looking heavy with relish, and won a following of his own. He made life hell for the Doctor throughout the eighth season and in various stories until Delgado's tragic death in a car accident in June 1973.

On Dr. Who's tenth anniversary, fans were given a season opening that has become a legend. In "The Three Doctors," a summit meeting of the title actors, William Hartnell (in ill health for some time) returned as the original Time Lord, and Patrick Troughton again donned the garb of the "cosmic hobo" to join Pertwee's third Doctor. The story saw Pertwee's exile ended and the Tardis restored to full operational (but still malfunctioning) status. The show also marked William Hartnell's last appearance as an actor. He passed away in April of 1975. He once declared, "I think that if I live to be ninety, a little of the magic of Doctor Who will still cling to me."

At the end of the eleventh season, viewers saw Jon Pertwee's Doctor dying in the last episode of "Planet of the Spiders," his body riddled with radiation from a battle with the mutated arachnids of Metebellis III. As his friends watched in awe, the Doctor underwent another transformation.

Tom Baker literally swooped down upon the show's audience at the start of the twelfth season, unleashing a new brand of manic enthusiasm to the character. His Cheshire Cat grin, mop of curly hair, 6'3" frame, wide-brimmed floppy hat, off-beat clothing, long multi-colored scarf (14 feet long, according to one report) and fond ness for jelly-babies have startled, bewildered and finally conquered the series' fans. The Doctor has never been the same since.

Liverpool-born Baker had been involved in amateur dramatics since age 15, when he was invited to join the Abbey Theatre, though his parents refused their permission. When a monk lectured at his school, Baker (intrigued with the "heroic aspects" of monastic life) entered a monastery at 16, but left six years later. "I was bored," he said, and was promptly drafted. He served his time in the Army in his own "unconventional" way, playing the sad sack. "I simply feigned idiocy right through my National Service and got away with murder," doing such things as wearing red slippers on parade, crying for effect during inspection and in clashes with officers. "That simply unhinged them." He was "violently keen on KP (Kitchen Police to you)." He was the platoon nut.

He had really paid his dues by the time he was spotted in a pub-side review and invited by Sir Laurence Olivier to join the National Theatre. Olivier later recommended Baker for his first film role, the hypnotic holy man Rasputin in the lavish Nicholas and Alexandra. But it was his performance as the evil Prince Khoura in Ray Harryhausen's Golden Voyage of Sinbad that interested Bill Slater, BBC Head of Serials. Slater got staffers Barry Letts and Terrance Dicks to take a look at the evil sorcerer who cast his sinister spells with style—and a gibberish Baker describes as "a mixture of Bar Mitzvah and Roman Catholic Mass, an uneasy alliance."

"I was terribly out of work when I got the Dr. Who job," Baker recalled in a news story. "I was temporarily working on a building site when the BBC approached me. A few weeks later, some of the men went out to buy the racing Standard, and there was my picture on the front page. They couldn't believe it—their cement mixer becoming Dr. Who!"

Since the beginning, the Doctor has been accompanied by numerous companions. Susan, Ian and Barbara were the first and, after Susan's departure at the end of the second Dalek adventure, "Dalek Invasion of Earth," a succession of companions from the past, present and future joined the Doctor in his exploits. Space doesn't allow touching all of them, but a partial roll call follows: Vicki (Maureen O'Brien, the survivor of a space expedition in 2493; Katarina (Adrienne Hill), young lady from the Trojan War; Dodo Chaplet (Jackie Lane), a "mod" young lady who entered the Tardis thinking it was a Police Box; Polly (Anneke Wills), secretary to the inventory of WOTAN, a power-mad computer; Jamie McCrimmon (Frazer Hines), one of the most popular of the Doctor's companions; Victoria Waterfield (Deborah Watling), a young lady from the Victorian era whose father was killed in a battle with the Daleks; Zoe Harriot (Wendy Padbury), astrophysicist on a space station in the future; teeny-bopperish Jo Grant (Katy Manning), the Doctor's second assistant; free-lance journalist Sarah Jane Smith (Elisabeth Sladen), the third of the Pertwee companions; Lt. Harry Sullivan (Ian Marter), a doctor on loan from the Royal Navy to UNIT; and Leela (Louise Jameson), a warrior-maid of the Sevateem tribe.

Tom Baker's tenure as the Doctor has seen the introduction of the Time Lord's non-human companions. The first was K-9, the remarkable dog-shaped mobile-computer-bank-cum-arsenal, the creation of writers Bob Baker and David Martin. Actor John Leeson had, until the end of the 16th season, given K-9 its distinctive voice, while visual effects man Ian Scoones provided its physical form. There have been two K-9s in the series; the first, K-9 mk I, left with Louise Jameson at the end of the 15th season. The second, K-9 mk II, was a duplicate built by the Doctor and has been with Baker's time/space wanderer ever since (a Time Lord's best friend?).

The second companion holds a unique distinction: she is the first alien humanoid to travel on a regular basis in the Tardis. Her name is Romanadvoratrelundar-Lady Romana for short, a graduate of the Time Lord Academy sent to assist the Doctor in the six-adventure epic quest for the segments of the "Key To Time." Originally, Romana was played by Mary Tamm during the series' 16th season, but her dissatisfaction with the way the character was being written grew until, at the conclusion of the shooting of the season's final story, "The Armageddon Factor," she announced she was leaving the show. A new Romana has helped open the latest (17th) season in the person of Lalla Ward, an actress who had portrayed the key role of Princess Astra in the previous episode (believe it or not, she turned out to be one of the segments of the Key!).

Costume-wise, the new Romana started off in a variation of the Doctor's own unorthodox outfit-albeit in pink, right down to a copy of Baker's long scarf (courtesy of costume designer June Hudson).

During its 16th season, Dr. Who reached its 15th anniversary, its 100th story ("Stones of Blood") and its 500th episode (part 1 of "Armageddon Factor"). Triple play!

The popularity and longevity the Doctor enjoys are impossible to deny. The character has been utilized in almost every popular medium imaginable. Two feature films, Dr. Who and the Daleks and Daleks-Invasion of Earth 2150 AD were made. On December 16, 1974, fans got another special Christmas present when a stage play, 7 Keys to Doomsday (written by staffer Terrance Dicks) opened for four weeks at London's Adelphi Theatre. Trevor Martin portrayed the Doctor (apparently a new regeneration from the Pertwee-style of Time Lord), while Wendy Padbury, Zoe of the Troughton era, renewed her acquaintance with the Doctor's adventures by portraying Jenny, one of two young people who become involved in the time traveler's latest battle with-what else?-the Daleks and the monstrous Clawrantulars.

There have been recordings made of the show's classic theme by Ron Grainer, the man responsible for the theme of the classic Prisoner series, a special record by Jon Pertwee entitled Who Is the Doctor, and even a story record put out in 1976 by Decca Records' Argo Division. Entitled Dr. Who and the Pescatons, the disc starred Tom Baker (who also narrated the story), Elisabeth Sladen as Sarah Jane and Bill Mitchel as Zor, leader of the monstrous Pescatons. Most mind-blowing of all the records is the disco version of the theme, entitled, simply, Dr. Who (fans have nicknamed it "Disco-Doctor"), performed by a group called Mankind. It made the British record charts and is reported to be a hard to find item.

Over 50 novelizations of the Doctor's adventures in his various incarnations have been published by Target Books (Pinnacle Books has published the American editions) as well as Dr. Who annuals (there have also been annuals for the Daleks), magazines, coloring books, dolls, jigsaw puzzles and trading cards. The list is astounding and there will obviously be more to come. There is even a Tardis bank, a battery-powered Dalek, and a model of K-9.

American viewers have only been able to see the first three seasons of Jon Pertwee's adventures and the first four seasons of Tom Baker's exploits. Unfortunately, these are all that Time-Life has purchased for syndication in this country.

Marvel Comics has taken an interest in the maverick Time Lord, and a Dr. Who weekly magazine is due on British newsstands at any time. It will feature a comic strip plus articles and pictures. U. S. fans will have to be content with a planned monthly mag which will only feature the comic strips. Marvel evidently feels that American audiences wouldn't be interested in articles on the shows (they've got to be kidding!).

As with any popular series, a fan club has sprung up for Dr. Who. Known as the Doctor Who Appreciation Society, this BBC-recognized organization has kept the flag waving with tremendous fervor. They have held three Who-conventions, known as Panopticons (named for the great meeting hall of the Time Lords on Gallifrey), and released two publications: a monthly newsletter called The Celestial Toyroom and an excellent magazine entitled Tardis.

Until recently, the club handled memberships from American and Canadian Who fans, but the response turned out to be so overwhelming that a North American branch of the DWAS is being set up for U. S. and Canadian fans.

Currently, Tom Baker has entered his sixth season as the Doctor, accompanied by Romana and K-9 mk II. John Leeson, as noted earlier, has left the series as K-9's voice, with actor David Brierly taking over (although K-9 will reportedly start the season suffering from "space laryngitis"). Already, the first of the new adventures has hit the airwaves: "Destiny of the Daleks," pitting the Doctor against his old enemies and introducing a new alien race, the Movellens. Other stories announced so far are "City of Death" (shot entirely in Paris-what is the connection between a spaceship that crashed millions of years ago and the Mona Lisa?), "The Creature From the Pit" and "Nightmare in Eden."

David Whitaker wrote these words for the Doctor, which contain the magic that has permeated this most unique of fantastic-oriented programs:

"Can you imagine silver leaves waving above a pool of liquid gold containing singing fishes? Twin suns that circle and fall in a rainbow heaven, another world in another sky? If you'd like to come with me, I'll show you all this-and it will be, I promise you, the dullest part of it all. Come with me and you will see wonders that no human has ever dreamt possible. Or stay behind and regret your staying until the day you die."

The Doctor continues his travels aboard the Tardis, and millions of fans have never regretted joining him for all these years.

I know I haven't.


Captions

1) Tom Baker, Elizabeth Sladen, the Tardis 2) Patrick Troughton, Jon Pertwee, William Hartnell 3) Cybermen 4) One of the Wirrns 6) Frederick Jasper as Prof. Sorenson 6) Mummy-robot 7) Tom Baker and friends

8) Tom Baker and a Zygon 91 a Mnoptera meets a Zarbi 10) Davros, creator of the Dalaks 11) William Hartnell and the Daleks 12) Tom Baker mind-wrestles the Morbius Monster 13) William Hartnell

14) The Robots of Death 15) Jon Pertwee and Draconians 16) Jon Pertwee, Kathy Manning at Dalek headquarters

17) Tom Baker, Elizabeth Sladen, Krynoid, Jon Pertwee, Thal soldiers and a dead Dalek 19) Tom Baker, Louise Jameson, K-9

20) William Hartnell and the Aridians 21) Elizabeth Sladen and Robot 22) Tom Baker, Louise Jameson 23) Jon Pertwee

Spelling corrections: Sydney Newman, Kit Pedler, Menoptra, Katy Manning


THE COMPLETE DOCTOR WHO SERIES CHECKLIST

A. WILLIAM HARTNELL (11/23/63-10/29/66)

1.AN UNEARTHLY CHILD

2.THE DEAD PLANET

3.THE EDGE OF DESTRUCTION

4.THE ROOF OF THE WORLD

5.THE SEA OF DEATH

6.THE TEMPLE OF EVIL

7.STRANGERS IN SPACE

8.A LAND OF FEAR

9.PLANET OF GIANTS

10.WORLD'S END

11.THE POWERFUL ENEMY

12.THE SLAVE TRADERS

13.THE WEB PLANET

14.THE LION

15.THE SPACE MUSEUM

16.THE EXECUTIONERS

17.THE WATCHER

18.FOUR HUNDRED DAWNS

19.MISSION TO THE UNKNOWN

20.TEMPLE OF SECRETS

21.THE NIGHTMARE BEGINS

22.WAR OF GOD

23.THE STEEL SKY

24.THE CELESTIAL TOYROOM

25.A HOLIDAY FOR THE DOCTOR

26.THE SAVAGES

27.THE WAR MACHINES

28.THE SMUGGLERS

29.THE TENTH PLANET


B. PATRICK TROUGHTON (11/5/66-6/21/69)

1. THE POWER OF THE DALEKS

2. THE HIGHLANDERS

3. THE UNDERWATER MENACE

4. THE MOONBASE

5. THE MACRA TERROR

6. THE FACELESS ONES

7. THE EVIL OF THE DALEKS

8. THE TOMB OF THE CYBERMEN

9. THE ABOMINABLE SNOWMEN

10. THE ICE WARRIORS

11. THE ENEMY OF THE WORLD

12. THE WEB OF FEAR

13. FURY FROM THE DEEP

14. THE WHEEL IN SPACE

15. THE DOMINATORS

16. THE MIND ROBBER

17. THE INVASION

18. THE KROTONS

19. THE SEEDS OF DEATH

20. THE SPACE PIRATES

21. THE WAR GAMES


C. JON PERTWEE (1/3/70-6/8/74)

1. SPEARHEAD FROM SPACE

2. THE SILURIANS

3. THE AMBASSADORS OF DEATH

4. INFERNO

5. THE TERROR OF THE AUTONS

6. THE MIND OF EVIL

7. THE CLAWS OF AXOS

8. COLONY IN SPACE

9. THE DAEMONS

10. THE DAY OF THE DALEKS

11. THE CURSE OF PELADON

12. THE SEA DEVILS

13. THE MUTANTS

14. THE TIME MONSTER

15. THE THREE DOCTORS

16. CARNIVAL OF MONSTERS

17. FRONTIER IN SPACE

18. PLANET OF THE DALEKS

19. THE GREEN DEATH

20. THE TIME WARRIOR


21. INVASION OF THE DINOSAURS

22. DEATH TO THE DALEKS

23. THE MONSTER OF PELADON

24. PLANET OF THE SPIDERS


D. TOM BAKER (12/28/74- )

1. ROBOT

2. THE ARK IN SPACE

3. THE SONTARAN EXPERIMENT

4. GENESIS OF THE DALEKS

5. THE REVENGE OF THE CYBERMEN

6. TERROR OF THE ZYGONS

7. PLANET OF EVIL

8. PYRAMIDS OF MARS

9. THE ANDROID INVASION

10. THE BRAIN OF MORBIUS

11. THE SEEDS OF DOOM

12. THE MASQUE OF MANDRAGORA

13. THE HAND OF FEAR

14. THE DEADLY ASSASSIN

15. THE FACE OF EVIL

16. THE ROBOTS OF DEATH

17. THE TALONS OF WENG-CHIANG

18. HORROR OF FANG ROCK

19. THE INVISIBLE ENEMY

20. IMAGE OF THE FENDAHL

21. THE SUN MAKERS

22. UNDERWORLD

23. THE INVASION OF TIME

24. THE RIBOS OPERATION

25. THE PIRATE PLANET

26. THE STONES OF BLOOD

27. THE ANDROIDS OF TARA

28. THE POWER OF KROLL

29. THE ARMAGEDDON FACTOR

30. THE DESTINY OF THE DALEKS

31. CITY OF DEATH

32. THE CREATURE FROM THE PIT

Disclaimer: These citations are created on-the-fly using primitive parsing techniques. You should double-check all citations. Send feedback to whovian@cuttingsarchive.org

  • APA 6th ed.: Hoffman, Eric L. (issue 39 (Sept./Oct. 1979)). The Many Faces of Doctor Who. Mediascene Prevue p. 17.
  • MLA 7th ed.: Hoffman, Eric L.. "The Many Faces of Doctor Who." Mediascene Prevue [add city] issue 39 (Sept./Oct. 1979), 17. Print.
  • Chicago 15th ed.: Hoffman, Eric L.. "The Many Faces of Doctor Who." Mediascene Prevue, edition, sec., issue 39 (Sept./Oct. 1979)
  • Turabian: Hoffman, Eric L.. "The Many Faces of Doctor Who." Mediascene Prevue, issue 39 (Sept./Oct. 1979), section, 17 edition.
  • Wikipedia (this article): <ref>{{cite news| title=The Many Faces of Doctor Who | url=http://cuttingsarchive.org/index.php/The_Many_Faces_of_Doctor_Who | work=Mediascene Prevue | pages=17 | date=issue 39 (Sept./Oct. 1979) | via=Doctor Who Cuttings Archive | accessdate=14 August 2022 }}</ref>
  • Wikipedia (this page): <ref>{{cite web | title=The Many Faces of Doctor Who | url=http://cuttingsarchive.org/index.php/The_Many_Faces_of_Doctor_Who | work=Doctor Who Cuttings Archive | accessdate=14 August 2022}}</ref>