Doctor Who Cuttings Archive

BBC timelord setting course for academia

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HE'S a student of the universe, with plenty of "Oh No" Levels and a masters in battling the Master ... but until now Doctor Who has rarely featured on the university syllabus.

But this July, a conference on the escapades of the quintessentially British time-and-space traveller will aim to put TV's longest-lived science-fiction hero on the academic map.

The Manchester event: Time And Relative Dissertations In Space - Critical Perspectives On Doctor Who, aims to establish a "broader academic literature" relating to the television timelord.

Hosted by the University of Manchester's Centre for Screen Studies, the conference has been organised by Dr David Butler. He says that the only previous serious study of the series was a 1983 thesis entitled Dr Who, The Unfolding Text, published when Peter Davison was in the title role.

Since then the series has had three additional leading men, suffered cancellation and been kept alive in the form of audio dramas, internet plays and novels until the announcement that it will return to our screens in 2005.

"Doctor Who's extraordinary longevity and diversity as a continuing narrative, embracing all manner of media, has been neglected by further academic discussion for too long," said Butler.

The conference features contributors from as far afield as Australia, Estonia and Minnesota. While some may have hidden behind their sofa cushions from monsters such as the Daleks, Ice Warriors and Zygons, it is clear that Private Eye's Pseuds Corner holds no fears for them.

Among the papers that will be presented at the event are: Totalitarian Tin Men - Assimilating Doctor Who's Cybermen; How To Pilot A Tardis - Doctor Who, Audiences And The Fantastic; and Popular Aesthetics And Academic Systems Of Value Judgement In Doctor Who.

Subjects to be covered include whether the wheezing, groaning sound of the hero's Tardis taking off can be classified as music, and the importance of "historical" stories in the science-fiction television series.

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  • APA 6th ed.: Naysmith, Stephen (2004-05-09). BBC timelord setting course for academia. Sunday Herald p. 8.
  • MLA 7th ed.: Naysmith, Stephen. "BBC timelord setting course for academia." Sunday Herald [add city] 2004-05-09, 8. Print.
  • Chicago 15th ed.: Naysmith, Stephen. "BBC timelord setting course for academia." Sunday Herald, edition, sec., 2004-05-09
  • Turabian: Naysmith, Stephen. "BBC timelord setting course for academia." Sunday Herald, 2004-05-09, section, 8 edition.
  • Wikipedia (this article): <ref>{{cite news| title=BBC timelord setting course for academia | url=http://cuttingsarchive.org/index.php/BBC_timelord_setting_course_for_academia | work=Sunday Herald | pages=8 | date=2004-05-09 | via=Doctor Who Cuttings Archive | accessdate=14 June 2024 }}</ref>
  • Wikipedia (this page): <ref>{{cite web | title=BBC timelord setting course for academia | url=http://cuttingsarchive.org/index.php/BBC_timelord_setting_course_for_academia | work=Doctor Who Cuttings Archive | accessdate=14 June 2024}}</ref>